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Safer States allies meeting in 2022
Alaska ACAT 2023 Juneau flyin
Megan Liu testifying in Washington copy 2
Connecticut Clean Water Action Governor signing PFAS bill
North Carolina Conservation Network
Minnesota Clean Water Action Amara Strande press conference
Farmer Fred Stone in Maine Bloomberg photo
Vermont Toxic-Free Families Act kids as ducks
Oregon Jamie Testimony
California BCPP congressional hearing
Maryland PIRG Canvassing staff
Rhode Island Jed Thorp testimony
Safer States allies meeting in 2022
Alaska ACAT 2023 Juneau flyin
Megan Liu testifying in Washington copy 2
Connecticut Clean Water Action Governor signing PFAS bill
North Carolina Conservation Network
Minnesota Clean Water Action Amara Strande press conference
Farmer Fred Stone in Maine Bloomberg photo
Vermont Toxic-Free Families Act kids as ducks
Oregon Jamie Testimony
California BCPP congressional hearing
Maryland PIRG Canvassing staff
Rhode Island Jed Thorp testimony
Safer States allies meeting in 2022
Alaska ACAT 2023 Juneau flyin
Megan Liu testifying in Washington copy 2
Connecticut Clean Water Action Governor signing PFAS bill
North Carolina Conservation Network
Minnesota Clean Water Action Amara Strande press conference
Farmer Fred Stone in Maine Bloomberg photo
Vermont Toxic-Free Families Act kids as ducks
Oregon Jamie Testimony
California BCPP congressional hearing
Maryland PIRG Canvassing staff
Rhode Island Jed Thorp testimony

Safer States: An Alliance for a Healthier World

35 states have introduced 492 policies to protect people from toxic chemicals.
348 state policies have been adopted in 39 states.
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Introduced
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Adopted
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Introduced & Adopted

Learn more about Toxics Policies

Convening the States Toward a Healthier World

Safer States provides a space for organizations to come together to build a healthier and just future. Together, we address critical issues such as public health threats from toxic chemicals, plastics and climate change.

 

We believe in the power of collective action. Through our extensive network and capacity-building initiatives, we empower each other to amplify our collective impact. 

Our Vision for a Healthier World

Vi Waghiyi, Environmental Justice and Health Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics, at a Women's March

“The health of our Indigenous Peoples of the Arctic depends on eliminating toxic chemicals and plastics that harm our health. We suffer disproportionate health disparities from our exposures, burdens that we did not create. The Arctic is a hemispheric sink for chemicals and plastics that are transported on atmospheric and oceanic currents from lower latitudes—we rely on policymakers to take urgent actions by passing effective legislation to prevent the production, use, and disposal of these dangerous substances that contaminate our traditional foods and bodies.”

Vi Waghiyi
Environmental Justice and Health Director, Alaska Community Action on Toxics, Tribal Citizen of the Native Village of Savoonga, Yupik Mother and Grandmother, White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council

Pictured here from left to right: Dana, Nora, and Michael Strande

“Governments must step up to protect innocent people like Amara who believed, through no fault of her own, she got cancer because of PFAS chemicals. Clean and safe drinking water is a human right. Products that are free of chemicals that can harm us is a basic expectation we all share. Amara’s Law will ban the use of “forever chemicals” in thousands of products in the state of Minnesota and other states should follow suit. We must stop exposure to these deadly chemicals as soon as possible.”

Michael Strande
Father to Amara Stande

“Thousands of farms across the country have been put at risk by the land application of sewage sludge and groundwater contamination. When farms get poisoned with PFAS, the farmers, farmworkers, and families are at a really elevated risk of exposure. We all want safe food, so we need to keep our farmland free of these persistent, toxic chemicals—that means no more careless disposal of sludge in America’s bread basket. We also need to get PFAS out of production wherever possible.”

Adam Nordel
PFAS impacted farmer and Campaign Manager at Defend Our Health

“Because of pressure from firefighters, farmers, and families there is a tremendous amount of momentum to address these threats from petrochemicals like PFAS and toxic materials like fossil fuel-based plastics. From state policy consideration to State AG action, states are continuing to lead efforts to protect public health with urgency and safer solutions.

Sarah Doll
Safer States, National Director

“These “forever chemicals” are killing us. Washington was the first state to ban PFAS in firefighting foam and require companies to disclose their use in our turnout gear. We led the nation. Now, we need to finish the job and ban these toxics, clean up contamination, and hold polluters responsible”.

A.J. Johnson
Washington State Council of Firefighters

“Time and time again, we’ve seen state policy transform key market sectors toward safer products. Allies across the country are actively pushing for retailers to eliminate more toxic chemicals and plastics from the products on their shelves and move to safer solutions across the board.”

Cindy Luppi
National Field Director, Clean Water Action